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Intel's new CEO pushes innovation

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Must Reads
Tuesday, June 18, 2013

Intel's CEO Brian Krzanich is encouraging the company to bring products to market quickly and then update them.

“He wants to see Intel move faster. That’s very clear,” Justin Rattner, the company’s chief technology officer, said today. “We’ve been legitimately accused of trying to get everything perfect before it comes to market.”

Rattner, who spoke at the Bloomberg Next Big Thing Summit in Half Moon Bay, California, said that the company is going to respond to a mobile market where products are introduced then rapidly updated. Intel has struggled to translate its dominance of personal computer processors into a foothold in tablets and smartphones.

Read more at Bloomberg.

{biztweet}intel ceo{/biztweet}

 

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