Sandy-damaged cars showing up for sale in Washington

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Thursday, June 13, 2013

Washington state's attorney general and the Better Business Bureau are warning that cars damaged in last fall's Superstorm Sandy are showing up for sale here.

Attorney General Bob Ferguson cautioned consumers in a statement issued Wednesday to do their research to make sure the vehicle they buy doesn't have flood damage.

While such cars may look normal, Ferguson says they almost always have serious problems including chronic mildew and corroded wires that can lead to electrical failure.

Read more at Oregonlive.

 

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