Klamath Tribes put out call for historic water rights

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Tuesday, June 11, 2013

The move will likely cut off irrigation water to hundreds of cattle ranchers and farmers in the upper basin this summer.

The historic calls come after Oregon set water rights priorities earlier this year in the basin, home to one of the nation's most persistent water wars. Drought has cut water flows in upper basin rivers to 40 percent of normal.

Read more at Oregonlive.

 

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0 #1 General Political ActivistGuest 2013-06-11 18:41:05
I recall the era of Termination, particularly during the 1950's, when my people (The Klamath, etc) were stripped of their inherent rights, identity, etc. At that time, did anyone ever stop to consider the irreparable harms, that would befall my people? For years, I observed the tribe(s) go thru endless rounds of federal level court litigation, negotiating with numerous attorneys, spending huge sums of money, to assert treaty rights, with mixed results. This turmoil, eventually took its toll on my family, and that of countless others. Today, treaty rights, that were often viewed an ancient relics, mocked upon, or downright laughed at, were once again upheld. This is not mere sweet revenge, however. There is a real drought taking place, and I see winning our treaty rights, as a burden, in the sense that we must be ever mindful stewards of a precious, dwindling natural resource. Now is not the time to relax. Instead, the hard work begins now. As leaders, it is upon our weary shoulders, to ensure that water is used in the most efficient and timely methods available. We must do so, in a way that encourages collaboration, and not further divide. Maybe water wars, are inevitable. Then again, maybe not...
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