Commission sets fall coho and chinook season

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Tuesday, June 11, 2013

The Oregon Fish and Wildlife Commission has approved the upcoming coastal fall salmon seasons, including several fisheries for wild coho.

For several years now, returns of Oregon coastal wild coho salmon have been strong enough to support limited harvest of wild coho. Under the regulations adopted, anglers will again be able to harvest wild coho from the Nehalem, Tillamook, Nestucca, Siletz, Yaquina, Alsea, Siuslaw, Umpqua, Coos and Coquille rivers and Tenmile lakes. New experimental coho fisheries will also occur in Beaver Creek (Lincoln County) and Floras Creek (Curry County). Most begin Sept. 15 and continue through November, with some exceptions.

Read more at the Daily Astorian.

 

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