Umatilla chemical depot to become business center

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Monday, June 10, 2013

The federal government is preparing to transfer its more than 9,000 acres to local control, and businesses could be recruited by 2014.

The Army has finished destruction of the last stores of chemical weapons kept at the depot, and the wide-open, grassy site in eastern Oregon is now being refashioned with an eye toward making money. 

Read more at Oregonlive.

 

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