Monsanto says Oregon wheat could be sabotage

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Thursday, June 06, 2013

Monsanto said that experimental genetically modified wheat found in an Oregon field could have gotten there through an "accidental or purposeful" act.

“It seems likely to be a random, isolated occurrence more consistent with the accidental or purposeful mixing of a small amount of seed during the planting, harvesting or during the fallow cycle in an individual field,” [Chief Technology Officer Robb] Fraley said on the call.

Asked whether the St. Louis-based company is suggesting the incident could be an act of sabotage, Fraley said, “That is certainly one of the options we are looking at.”

Read more at Bloomberg.

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