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Oregon ranks low for teen employment

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Must Reads
Tuesday, June 04, 2013

Oregon is the eighth worst state for teenage unemployment, a new survey says.

“It’s still a tough economy and businesses would rather hire someone who has a track record,” said Christian Kaylor, an economist at Worksource Oregon. “Teenagers simply don’t have that."

Jobs available to teens include ones in retail, hospitality and restaurants. Burgerville is one of the state’s top employers for teens, with the young workers making up more than 27 percent of its workforce.

Read more at KGW.

{biztweet}teen employment{/biztweet}

 

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