Unapproved GMO wheat found in Oregon

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Thursday, May 30, 2013

Unapproved genetically engineered wheat was discovered in an Oregon field, which could affect exports to countries that don't accept genetically modified foods.

Oregon exports about 90% of its wheat.

The Agriculture Department said Wednesday that the genetically engineered wheat is safe to eat and there is no evidence that modified wheat entered the marketplace. But the department is investigating how it ended up in the field, whether there was any criminal wrongdoing and whether its growth is widespread.

No genetically engineered wheat has been approved for U.S. farming. USDA officials said the wheat is the same strain as a genetically modified wheat that was legally tested by seed giant Monsanto a decade ago but never approved. Monsanto stopped testing that product in Oregon and several other states in 2005.

Read more at USA Today.

{biztweet}wheat oregon{/biztweet}

 

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