Elephants Deli goes green

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Thursday, May 30, 2013

Elephants Delicatessen added new recycling and composting stations to keep more items out of the waste stream.

The strategy ties into what CEO Anne Weaver said are long-held beliefs in preserving the environment. The company buys all of its energy from renewable sources and subscribes to city and Metro conservation principles.

Elephants founder Elaine Rhine Tanzer said she first saw the GreenDrop Stations in use at the Rose Garden. The system helped the Trail Blazers increase its landfill diversion rate from 38 percent in 2007 to 90 percent in 2011.

Read more at Sustainable Business Oregon.

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