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CenturyLink wants to cut back on maintenance in Oregon

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Wednesday, May 22, 2013

The largest provider of landline telephone and Internet service in Oregon wants to cut back on how often it repairs utility poles.

The company is asking state regulators to put off repair for 10 years instead of the current two.

CenturyLink has asked the Oregon Public Utility Commission for permission to put off the routine maintenance because it says it cannot afford to do the work. Separately, CenturyLink also acknowledges its corporate debts have given it little financial room in which to maneuver.

The company’s request concerns other utilities, who say putting off basic maintenance for a decade to cut costs sets a bad precedent.

Read more at Willamette Week.

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