Home Must Reads Urban Airship to move into Vestas' offices

Urban Airship to move into Vestas' offices

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Must Reads
Tuesday, May 21, 2013

Portland startup Urban Airship is moving its headquarters into the Pearl District offices of wind turbine manufacturer Vestas.

The move illustrates the divergent fortunes of the two companies.

Urban Airship has been lifted by fevered demand for smartphone apps, while Vestas has been buffeted by turbulence in the wind energy market.

They'll share space in Vestas' offices, a former Meier & Frank warehouse that opened last year after a $66 million remodel by developer Gerding Edlen, which was financed in part with help from Portland and the state of Oregon.

Read more at OregonLive.com.

{biztweet}urban airship vestas{/biztweet}

 

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