Home Must Reads Intel's shares climbed during Otellini's years

Intel's shares climbed during Otellini's years

| Print |  Email
Must Reads
Thursday, May 16, 2013

Intel's share price climbed 17% during Paul Otellini's eight years as CEO.

During Otellini's tenure, Intel weathered the revenue-sapping Great Recession and lost out on the exploding market for smartphones and tablets. The stock's growth has trailed both the Nasdaq composite index and the Standard & Poor's 500.

Yet Intel enjoyed record sales and profits in recent years, and made major breakthroughs that kept its microprocessors on technology's leading edge.

Read more at OregonLive.com.

{biztweet}intel ceo{/biztweet}

 

More Articles

The Diaspora

October 2014
Thursday, September 25, 2014
BY LEE VAN DER VOO

Former newspaper reporters move into brand journalism.


Read more...

Knight Vision

October 2014
Thursday, September 25, 2014
BY VIVIAN MCINERNY

Travis Knight wants to release a movie a year. Can he pull it off?


Read more...

Molecular Movies

September 2014
Wednesday, August 27, 2014
BY LINDA BAKER

Dr. Chong Fang isn’t God. But the assistant professor of chemistry at Oregon State University is getting closer to figuring out how he put everything together. 


Read more...

Powerlist: Colleges and Universities

September 2014
Wednesday, August 27, 2014
BY KIM MOORE

A conversation about higher education with the presidents of the University of Oregon and Clackamas Community College, followed by September's powerlist.


Read more...

What I'm Reading

October 2014
Thursday, September 25, 2014

Nick Herinckx, CEO of Obility, and Jake Weatherly, CEO of SheerID, share what they've been reading.


Read more...

Two Sides of the Coin

Contributed Blogs
Friday, September 26, 2014
0926 iphone6-thumbBY JASON NORRIS | GUEST BLOGGER

This post focuses on the recent release of the new Apple iPhone as well as Alibaba's IPO, the largest U.S. IPO in history.


Read more...

The Rail Baron

October 2014
Thursday, September 25, 2014
BY LINDA BAKER

Oil is gushing out of the U.S. and Canada, and much of it is coming from places that don’t have pipeline infrastructure. So it’s being shipped by rail.


Read more...
Oregon Business magazinetitle-sponsored-links-02
SPONSORED LINKS