Audit says Oregon not tracking food-stamp fraud

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Wednesday, May 15, 2013

Oregon's Department of Human Services doesn't know how much fraud is going on among the 813, 446 Oregon Trail cardholders, a new audit says.

DHS officials have tried to dismiss that portion of the audit. But auditors found 37,300 clients of the program had requested five or more replacement cards in the previous three years—a warning sign recipients may be selling them.

Oregon Trail cardholders get their monthly allotment of SNAP benefits (the average is $129 a month) credited to their accounts on the first day of the month. When they go to buy groceries, they run the cards like a debit card, using a secret personal identification number, or PIN.

Read more at Willamette Week.

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