OUS chancellor worries about affordability

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Monday, May 13, 2013

The Oregon University System interim chancellor is worried that tuition increases will stop enrollment growth at Oregon's public universities.

So far tuition increases averaging 6 percent a year over the past decade haven't seemed to affect demand. But there are signs that is about to change.

One of those signs is the mounting problem of student debt.

Rose says it's time for schools and the state of Oregon to try harder to address the issues of affordability. A few efforts show some promise, like online education and a plan to help high school students earn more college credit.

Read more at The Statesman Journal.

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