Construction hiring not keeping pace with rebound

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Friday, May 10, 2013

Housing construction is booming, but the industry is struggling to keep up with its workforce down 38%.

U.S. builders and the subcontractors they depend on are struggling to hire fast enough to meet rising demand for new homes. Builders would be starting work on more homes — and contributing more to the economy — if they could fill more job openings.

In the meantime, workers in the right locations with the right skills are commanding higher pay.

Read more at The Register-Guard.

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