Beaverton Farmers Market gets dog-sitting

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Tuesday, May 07, 2013

Hillsboro nonprofit HomePlate Youth Services is debuting Sit-n-Stay, a dog-sitting service at the Beaverton Farmers Market.

Sit-n-Stay is the newest employment venture for Hillsboro's HomePlate Youth Services, a nonprofit drop-in center serving young homeless people in Washington County since 2005. While HomePlate provides weekly dinners, hygiene supplies and activities, their Youth Employment Program, started in 2012, provides help with resumes, leadership, job searching and placement.

The Beaverton market, which hosts nearly 20,000 shoppers each week, has always been a pet-free zone. For those who bring their pooches to the market, a secure leash-up area for dogs seemed a good solution, combined with the opportunity for part-time employment for homeless youth in Washington County.

Read more at OregonLive.com.

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0 #1 Concerned Pet Parent & Homeless AdvocateGuest 2013-05-07 21:28:32
I am all about helping the homeless. I donate monthly to my church that directly has a financial impact. I volunteer to help with food pantry and shelter issues, too. However, I don't know if it is wise to ask parents of pets to trust their pets to teens who have likely suffered abuse of some kind and are, at best, in a fragile emotional state. Are homeless youth ready to take responsibility of caring for a family's beloved pet? Even with adult supervision, is this asking too much of homeless teens? These teens need to be ministered TO, and, likely are not ready to be ministering to the needs of others, including our four legged friends. If we would not give a homeless teen a pet for fear of neglecting responsibility for it, why are we asking them to take responsibility for an employment position in which they are responsible for many other pets? Isn't there a safer way to accomplish both goals?
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