Sponsored by George Fox University
Home Linda Baker's Blog John Mitchell predicts cloudy economy, few silver linings

John Mitchell predicts cloudy economy, few silver linings

| Print |  Email
Linda Baker
Thursday, January 10, 2013

BY LINDA BAKER

t JohnMitchellAt Wednesday's Portland Business Alliance Forum breakfast, Oregon economist John Mitchell presented his view of where the regional and national economy is headed in 2013. It was a cautiously optimistic short term outlook — not so optimistic for the long term. Alas, Mitchell would not allow me to reprint his end-of-speech poem, a brilliant and funny recap of 2013 data points: interest rates, inflation, job growth, taxes and so forth. Instead, here are a few notable and quotable excerpts from Mitchell’s talk:

• People who are waiting for the economy to turn around are a bit misinformed.  The economy has actually been on the upswing since 2009, although it’s been a barely perceptible upswing.  “The next turn is down,” Mitchell said.

•  Much of GDP growth in Q3 2012 came from an increase in defense spending and inventory accumulation, neither of which are going to continue their upward trajectory.  “We’re going to see weaker growth in the 4th quarter.”

• Housing was late to the party, but thanks to price declines and historically low interest rates, it has been a growth sector for six quarters, and is now one of the few bright spots.  Nationwide, residential permits are up 32% during the first 11 months of 2012.  

•  The number of renters is also increasing, thanks to young people who are shying away from home ownership and tighter credit standards. Mitchell recounted a joke currently making the rounds in mortgage lending circles:  in the old days, banks handed out mortgages to anyone with a pulse, otherwise known as “P.”  Today lenders require both a “P” and a “U”: a urinalysis and a polygraph.

 •  Job growth is on the upswing in 44 states, but not by much. About 4 million people are out of work, and the labor force participation rate is about 63 %.  The last time it was that low was December 1981.

• The policy cauldron threatens to drown us all.  “The debt ceiling was punted, not dealt with."  The country also faces two very different problems:  a short-term problem of weakness and long-term problem of unfunded promises. "These are two very different things that require different solutions.  Short-term weakness says you stimulate the economy. The  long-term problem says you've got to have some restraint."

• The big picture for 2013: “It’s a 2% forecast: 2% growth, 2% inflation. Not exciting, but up.”   But if the short-term forecast is for very slow growth, the long-term implications are sclerosis and stagnation.  “We’re on a Japan path.”

After the talk, I caught up briefly with Mitchell, who tacked on another problem that threatens to explode in the coming years: the clash of generations. Every generation likes to think it’s the apocalyptic generation, and that the world is going to hell, said Mitchell.

But there’s a qualitative difference between today’s apocalyptic thinkers and those of generations past, Mitchell said. Typically, it’s the elder generation bemoaning the excesses of the young.

“This time it’s the old people doing it to the young,” said Mitchell. With an unsustainable fiscal sitution, including expansion of Medical entitlements, sapping spending in education, health care and infrastructure, baby boomers are reaping the benefits while young people paying into the system will be left with nothing but the bill.

Or, as Mitchell put it,  “There’s no Association for Non-Retired Persons” lobbying on behalf of children or young adults.   

He alerted me to a book: the Clash of Generations: Saving Ourselves Our Kids and Our Economy, a call to arms that describes a U.S. in worse shape than the bailed-out countries of Greece and Ireland and the pending financial catastrophe facing our children.

“Read it, and I guarantee you won’t be able to sleep at night,” Mitchell said.  

It's not exactly poetry, but a pretty concise recap of the 21st-century U.S. economic outlook nonetheless.

Linda Baker is managing editor of Oregon Business.

 

Comments   

 
Guest
0 #1 ownerGuest 2013-01-13 04:52:41
Really good analysis. The best short article on this that I have seen.
Quote | Report to administrator
 

More Articles

Why I became an Oregon angel investor

Guest Blog
Monday, July 14, 2014
AngelInvestBY TERRY "STARBUCKER" ST. MARIE

I really didn’t know that much about angel investing, but I did know a lot about the entrepreneurial spirit.


Read more...

The global challenge

News
Friday, June 27, 2014
062714 thumb globalmarketBY JASON NORRIS | OB BLOGGER

Over the last several months we have seen a wave of cross-border acquisitions, primarily U.S.-based companies looking to purchase non-U.S.-based companies. There are a few reasons for this, but the main culprit is the U.S. corporate tax system. The United States has one of the highest corporate tax rates in the world.


Read more...

Portland: Where young people go to work?

News
Friday, June 06, 2014
UntitledBY KATIE AUSBURGER | OB GUEST CONTRIBUTOR

How to build a hipster-friendly work environment.


Read more...

The business of running a food cart

News
Thursday, June 05, 2014
OBM1BY HANNAH WALLACE | OB BLOGGER

What does it take to launch and run one of these mobile food businesses?  


Read more...

Oversight? Or gaming the system?

News
Monday, July 14, 2014
AmazonBY VIVIAN MCINERNY | OB BLOGGER

Some people think Amazon’s winking eye logo is starting to look like a hoodwink.


Read more...

The Scott Kveton affair

News
Wednesday, July 09, 2014
ScottKvetonBY LINDA BAKER | OB EDITOR

Scott Kveton, the CEO of Urban Airship is taking a leave of absence from the company. As the story continues to unfold, here’s our perspective on a few of the key players.


Read more...

OB Video: Dress for Success

News
Wednesday, July 02, 2014
DFSOBY JESSICA RIDGWAY | OB WEB EDITOR

Dress for Success Oregon promotes the economic independence of disadvantaged women by providing professional attire, a network of support and career development tools.


Read more...
Oregon Business magazinetitle-sponsored-links-02
SPONSORED LINKS