Good season despite climate change worries

| Print |  Email
Written by Emma H.   
Thursday, December 13, 2012

12.13.12 Thumbnail SkiOregon prides itself on having the longest ski season in the U.S., with November-May openings. But a new report projects climate change will warm winter temperatures 4-10 degrees by the end of the century, threatening the long snow season that allows Oregon's winter sports industry to thrive.

BY EMMA HALL

12.13.12 Blog SkiOregon prides itself on having the longest ski season in the U.S., with November-May openings. But a new report projects climate change will warm winter temperatures 4-10 degrees by the end of the century, threatening the long snow season that allows Oregon's winter tourism to thrive.

The report by the Natural Resources Defense Council and nonprofit Save our Winters says the $12.2 billion U.S. winter tourism industry has lost $1 billion in 38 states in the last decade from diminishing snowfall. It projects that snow depths in the West could decline by 25% to 100% over the next decade. 

Oregon is especially affected by low snowfall. It is one of the most-changed states when it comes to skier visits on high and low snowfall years, with a loss of 31% of visits on low years. 

Last season was one of the hardest for the industry as a whole, as the U.S. saw its weakest snowfall in 20 years. Snowfall in the normally busy holiday season was low, and though it had picked up by mid-January (Mt. Bachelor even got 106 inches in one week), resorts couldn't make up for the loss of the busiest week of the year. “Last season was one of the most challenging in the history of the ski industry,” said Dave Rathbun, Mt. Bachelor’s president and general manager, in a letter to season pass holders.

The slow start to the season led the U.S. snow sports industry to see its worst season since 1991. The Pacific Northwest saw a decline in visits of 5.7% over the strong 2010/2011 season. KGW's Chief Meteorologist Matt Zaffino says 2012/2013 will be a good year for the Northwest snowpack, though not as good as two years ago. An El Nino seemed to be developing in late summer, but it is no longer a threat, Zaffino says. Read his Ski Oregon Season Outlook for more. 

Snow conditions so far:

Mt. Hood Meadows: Mt. Hood has a base snow depth of 48 inches, and was able to open its night skiing last night, Dec. 12.  Average annual snowfall of 430 inches.

Mt. Bachelor: This Bend ski resort has the most snow this season so far, with a total of 115 iches. It has the highest skiable elevation in Oregon and Washington, which contributes to its long season.

Hoodoo: This Central Oregon ski area opened last weekend, but only on Thursdays-Sundays until more snow falls. Current levels are 32.1 inches. 52 inches were predicted for the first weekend of December, but Hoodoo only ended up getting a 17-inch base. It's average annual snowfall is 450 inches.

Skibowl: Not open yet. The first of its seven lifts and tows is set to open this weekend, Dec. 15. It currently has 14 inches to 24 inches of snow. Average annual snowfall is 300-350 inches.

Emma Hall is web editor for Oregon Business.

 

Comments   

 
Guest
0 #1 Exc. Director, Eastern Oregon Visitors Assn.Guest 2012-12-14 18:52:09
Sorry that you missed mentioning the East-side of Oregon. Anthony Lakes ski area is open with a 37 inch base, and truly best opening day powder skiing anyone can remember in the 50 year history.
Quote | Report to administrator
 

More Articles

Biker dreams

The Latest
Friday, May 15, 2015
bike at ater wynn-thumbBY KIM MOORE | RESEARCH EDITOR

The Portland Bureau of Transportation is seeking input from businesses on a $5.5 million initiative to create a network of biking, transit and pedestrian trails within Portland’s central city.


Read more...

Urban renewer

Linda Baker
Wednesday, June 24, 2015
UnknownBY LINDA BAKER   

One year after he was appointed chair of the Portland Development Commission, Tom Kelly talks about PDC's longevity, Neil Kelly's comeback and his new role as Portlandia's landlord.


Read more...

Cherry Raincoat

June 2015
Tuesday, May 26, 2015
BY LINDA BAKER

Spring rains are the bane of an Oregon cherry farmer’s existence. Even a few sprinkles can crack the fruit so badly it’s not worth picking. Science to the rescue: Researchers at Oregon State University have developed a spray-on film that cuts rain-related cracking in half, potentially saving a season’s crop. The coating, patented as SureSeal, is made from natural chemicals similar to those found in the skins of cherries: cellulose, palm oil-based wax and calcium.


Read more...

Intrepid reporter checks out ZoomCare rebrand

The Latest
Wednesday, May 27, 2015
dentistthumbPHOTOS BY JASON E. KAPLAN

Like all good journalists, OB editorial staff typically eschew freebies. But health care costs being what they are, digital news editor Jacob Palmer couldn't resist ZoomCare's offer of a three-in-one (cleaning, exam, whitening) dental office visit, guaranteed to take no more than 57 minutes. 


Read more...

Stemming the tide of money in politics

Linda Baker
Wednesday, June 10, 2015
 jeff-lang-2012-thumbBY LINDA BAKER

Jeff Lang and his wife Rae used to dole out campaign checks like candy.  “We were like alcoholics,” Lang says. ”We couldn’t just give a little.”


Read more...

Up in the Air

June 2015
Friday, May 22, 2015
BY ANNIE ELLISON

Portland tech veteran Ben Berry is leaving his post as Portland’s chief technology officer for a full-time role producing unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) aimed at first responders and the military. Berry’s AirShip Technologies Group is poised to be on the ground floor of an industry that will supply drones to as many as 100,000 police, fire and emergency agencies nationwide. He reveals the plan for takeoff.


Read more...

The Backstory: Portland Youth Builders

The Latest
Wednesday, June 03, 2015
blog002 1BY JASON E. KAPLAN | STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

As part of our green workplaces story, Oregon Business checked out a community service project undertaken by Portland Youth Builders, a nonprofit alternative high school. In partnership with Whole Foods, PYB built garden boxes for a Home Forward  housing site. Home Forward is a government agency that provides housing for low income residents and people with disabilities.


Read more...
Oregon Business magazinetitle-sponsored-links-02
SPONSORED LINKS