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LNG fight club

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High Five
Monday, June 08, 2009

The debate continues in Salem over building liquified natural gas pipelines and terminals in Oregon. Utilities and business groups are pitted against community groups and environmental activists. And one way they may be influencing the results: campaign contributions.

Since the beginning of last year's election cycle, LNG supporters have marinated lawmakers with cash contributions. They have employed veteran lobbyists to work the Capitol, spreading a professionally tailored message focused on job creation and energy security that has sold well to legislators looking for relief from the recession. That, in turn, has made LNG projects a top priority for a core constituency of the Democratic majority: organized labor.

Facing off against them is a grass-roots collection of landowners, county farm bureaus and community activists who have aligned with another Democratic Party mainstay: the environmental lobby.

Read the full article at Oregonlive.com.

 

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J Barton
0 #1 LNG for OregonJ Barton 2009-06-09 10:43:44
Oregon needs to look beyond the end of its nose. Canadian gas, Oregon's largest source of gas, is starting to play out and will be mostly gone in 20 year. Wind and solar are many years away from being primary energy sources. Coal is the dirtiest, gas is the cleanest of the hydrocarbon fuels. LNG can be on board in just a few years and is a safe, clean and cheap replacement for coal. LNG is the best insurance against catastrophicall y high energy costs and disruptions in supply for the west coast. Not a nickle's worth of taxpayer funds are used to bring it here, no subsidies. If it turns out that it is eventually not needed, the risk is all on private investors. This brouhaha of opposition is emotional, irrational and unfounded in facts. Tell the governor and the legislature to quit pandering to the BANANA people (Build Absolutely Nothing Anywhere Near Anyplace), they are vocal but they are few. Most do not work and therefor have ample time to have causes. The rest of us are busy trying to make a living and must rely on our elected representatives to do what is right. That should not be construed as apathy. We need the job and we need the energy.
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