From the Wires

U.S. cervical cancer rate higher than previously thought

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Monday, May 12, 2014

CBS: A study shows the rate is up 55% among all women.

 

McDonalds tests seasoned french fries

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Friday, May 09, 2014

Salon.com: McDonald’s says it plans to start testing seasoned french fries at select U.S. locations starting Friday.

 

Apple close to buying Beats for $3.2 billion

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Friday, May 09, 2014

Reuters: Both companies are hashing out details and the envisioned deal could still fall through.

 

Fast food workers plan to strike in 150 cities

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Thursday, May 08, 2014

CNN: Fast food workers have been calling on their employers to raise the minimum wage to $15 per hour.

 

CO2 reduces nutrients in major food crops

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Thursday, May 08, 2014

BBC: A new study reports that rising levels of carbon dioxide worldwide will significantly affect the nutrient content of crops.

 

WSJ Twitter account hacked

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Wednesday, May 07, 2014

CNN: The Wall Street Journal Twitter account was hacked by the Syrian Electronic Army.

 

WHO: Maternal deaths falling worldwide

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Wednesday, May 07, 2014

BBC: New figures show that maternal deaths worldwide have dropped by 45% since 1990.

 

Office Depot shares up 20%

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Tuesday, May 06, 2014

Forbes: News that the retailer will close 400 stores by 2016 sent Office Depot shares soaring.

 

World facing polio health emergency

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Tuesday, May 06, 2014

BBC: The World Health Organization declared the spread of polio as an international public health emergency.

 

Coca-Cola drops flame retardant ingredient in sports drink

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Monday, May 05, 2014

TIME: The company will no longer use brominated vegetable oil, which has been linked to a flame retardant, in its Powerade sports drink.

 

Study: Young blood rejuvenates older animals

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Monday, May 05, 2014

CBS: Older mice who were given blood and blood proteins from young mice showed improved muscle and brain function.

 

U.S. added 288,000 jobs in April

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Friday, May 02, 2014

WSJ: The unemployment rate in America dropped to 6.3%, the lowest since September 2008.

 

CDC: Five things cause two-thirds of U.S. deaths

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Friday, May 02, 2014

CNN: Five conditions cause nearly 900,000 deaths per year in America: heart disease, cancer, lung disease, stroke and unintentional injuries, like car accidents or medication overdoses.

 
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Page 25 of 109

More Articles

The short list: Holiday habits of six Oregon CEOs

The Latest
Thursday, December 11, 2014
121214-xmaslist1BY JACOB PALMER | OB DIGITAL NEWS EDITOR

We ask business and nonprofit leaders how they survive the season.


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Fly Zone

November/December 2014
Wednesday, October 22, 2014
BY JOE ROJAS-BURKE

The black soldier fly’s larvae are among the most ravenous and least picky eaters on earth.


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Crowdfunding 2.0

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Tuesday, December 02, 2014
120214-crowdfund-thumbBY LINDA BAKER

A conversation with attorney Erich Merrill about the latest way to raise money from large groups of people.


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Behind the curtain: What students should know about accreditation and rankings

Contributed Blogs
Thursday, December 04, 2014
120414-edurating-thumbBY DEBRA RINGOLD | OP-ED CONTRIBUTOR

How important are institutional and/or program evaluations provided by third parties in selecting a college or university program?


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See How They Run

January-Powerbook 2015
Friday, December 12, 2014
BY LINDA BAKER

Studying ground-running birds, a group that ranks among nature's speediest and most agile bipedal runners, to build a faster robot.


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Editor's Letter: Power Play

January-Powerbook 2015
Thursday, December 11, 2014

There’s a fascinating article in the December issue of the Harvard Business Review about a profound power shift taking place in business and society. It’s a long read, but the gist revolves around the tension between “old power” and “new power” as a driver of transformation. Here’s an excerpt:

Old power works like a currency. It is held by few. Once gained, it is jealously guarded, and the powerful have a substantial store of it to spend. It is closed, inaccessible, and leader-driven. It downloads, and it captures.

New power operates differently, like a current. It is made by many. It is open, participatory, and peer-driven. It uploads, and it distributes. Like water or electricity, it’s most forceful when it surges. The goal with new power is not to hoard it but to channel it.

The authors, Henry Timms and Jeremy Heimans, don’t necessarily favor one form of power over another but merely outline how power is transitioning, and how companies can take advantage of these changes to strengthen their positions in the marketplace. 

Our Powerbook issue might be viewed as a case study in the new-power transition. This annual book of lists provides information on leading businesses, nonprofits and universities in the state. Most of the featured companies are entrenched power players now pursuing more flexible and less hierarchical approaches to doing business. Law firms, for example, are adopting new technologies and fee structures to make legal services more accessible and affordable.

This month we also take a look at a controversial new U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission rule requiring public companies to disclose the median pay of workers, as well as the ratio between CEO and median-worker pay. 

Part of the 2010 Dodd-Frank financial reform law, the rule will compel public companies to be more open about employee compensation, with the assumption that greater transparency will improve corporate performance and, perhaps, help address one of the major challenges of our time: income inequality.

New power is not only about strategy and tactics, the Harvard Business Review authors say. “The ultimate questions are ethical. The big question is whether new power can genuinely serve the common good and confront society’s most intractable problems.”

That sounds like a call to arms. Or a New Year’s resolution. Old power or new, the goals are the same: to be a force for positive change in the world. Happy 2015!

— Linda


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The short list: 4 companies engaged in a battle of the paddles

The Latest
Thursday, December 04, 2014
pingpongthumbBY JACOB PALMER | OB DIGITAL NEWS EDITOR

Nothing says startup culture like a ping pong table in the office, lounge or lobby.


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