Home From the Wires A haven for banned books in Hong Kong

A haven for banned books in Hong Kong

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Thursday, April 11, 2013

The Atlantic: People's Recreation Community is a tiny bookstore in Hong Kong's Causeway Bay known for selling the widest range of banned books available in greater China.

Information wants to be free, so the saying goes, and in China's repressive media environment, millions still manage to circumvent government censorship to access sites such as Facebook, Twitter, and YouTube. Subverting the so-called "Great Firewall" can be as easy as paying for a virtual private network (VPN) service, and once past the firewall, Chinese internet users are free to check out whatever forbidden websites they want.

 

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