Judge strikes restrictions on 'morning after' pill

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Friday, April 05, 2013

Reuters: A federal judge ordered the Food and Drug Administration to make  emergency contraception pills available without a prescription to all girls of reproductive age.

The ruling is a victory for reproductive-rights groups that had sought to remove age and other restrictions on emergency contraception.

 

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