Rate of ADHD diagnosis skyrockets

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Tuesday, April 02, 2013

NYTimes: Nearly one in five high school-aged boys has been diagnosed with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder.

That's about about twice the rate of girls in the same age group, according to an analysis of 2011-12 data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

 

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