Employees fired over Ford art depicting tied-up women

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Wednesday, March 27, 2013

 

CNN.com: The India-based advertising agency that created artwork of women tied up in the back of a Ford has sacked some of the employees responsible for the images.

The cartoonish drawings, produced by WPP unit JWT, were never part of a paid campaign. But they have struck a nerve as India institutes new rules to protect women following a series of high-profile gang rapes.

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