Chimps: the original team players

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Wednesday, March 20, 2013

Los Angeles Times: Humans aren't alone in the ability to work together toward a common goal. Many executives would be pleased by chimpanzees' selfless efforts to further their unit's objectives

With the lure of a juicy grape before them and two specialized tools in hand, chimps were able to work in pairs and free the fruit from a complex trap, according to a pair of European researchers working at the Sweetwaters Chimpanzee Sanctuary in Kenya.

"Chimpanzees not only coordinate different roles, but they also know which particular action the partner needs to perform,” the authors wrote, arguing that "many of chimpanzees' limitations in collaboration are, perhaps, more motivational than cognitive."

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