Facebook and Google to design cancer research game

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Friday, March 01, 2013

Reuters.com: Scientists are teaming up with technology gurus from Amazon, Facebook and Google to design and develop a mobile game aimed at speeding the search for new cancer drugs.

The project, led by the charity Cancer Research UK, should mean that anyone with a smart phone and five minutes to spare will be able to investigate vital scientific data at the same time as playing a mobile game.

 

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