Thin snowpack in much of West portends continued drought

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Friday, February 22, 2013

 

New York Times: After last year's extreme drought and destructive wildfires, Western farmers and ranchers hoped for heavy snows this winter, but so far they have been disappointed.

Across the West, lakes are half full and mountain snows are thin, omens of another summer of drought and wildfire. Complicating matters, many of the worst-hit states now have even less water on hand than a year ago, raising the specter of shortages and rationing that could inflict another year of losses on struggling farms.

Reservoir levels have fallen sharply in Arizona, Colorado, New Mexico and Nevada. The soil is drier than normal. And while a few recent snowstorms have cheered skiers, the snowpack is so thin in parts of Colorado that the government has declared an “extreme drought” around the ski havens of Vail and Aspen.

“We’re worse off than we were a year ago,” said Brian Fuchs, a climatologist at the National Drought Mitigation Center.

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Guest
0 #1 CEOGuest 2013-02-22 23:45:34
Stop using fear tactics to sell your news. Every year I read about drought, vermon, fire, floods and more that is going to be the end of life as we know it. GET A GRIP. Things are always changing and always will.....
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