Maker's Mark cuts alcohol content due to bourbon scarcity

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Monday, February 11, 2013

New York Daily News: Growing popularity has led to a scarcity of bourbon, so Kentucky-based Maker's Mark plans to cut alcohol content by 3%.

Owners of the world famous beverage — whose slogan is "It tastes expensive... and is" — say they are finding it hard to produce enough of their product to meet growing demand.

An unpredicted surge in popularity — and the fact each bottle has to be aged for up to six-and-a-half years — has also forced them to cut the drink's ABV (alcohol by volume) from 45 to 42 per cent.

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