Scientists nail down more precise dinosaur extinction date

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Friday, February 08, 2013

BBC: Scientists have determined the most precise date yet for dinosaur extinction, using dating techniques on rock and ash samples. Dinosaurs died 66,038,000 years ago, give or take 11,000 years.

That date appears to coincide with the impact of a comet or asteroid.

Debate has raged as to whether the giant impact was the sole cause of a quick demise of the dinosaurs, whether they were already in decline at the time of the impact, or whether the impact in fact happened as much as 300,000 years after they were gone.

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