Instagram releases a real website

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Tuesday, February 05, 2013
CNET: Facebook-owned Instagram launched a website that works just like its iPhone and Android apps, except for photo uploading capabilities.

Instagram members can today log in to Instagram.com to view a stream of friends' photos in a photo feed that closely mirrors the experience of Instagram's mobile feed. Photos are displayed one at a time in reverse chronological order, and features such as double-clicking a photo to "like" it and inline comments have also been carried over to the new web experience. Unfortunately, website users cannot upload photos to Instagram.com, which means the photo-sharing piece of the Instagram equation remains mobile-only.

"Your Instagram Feed on the web functions much like it does on your mobile phone," Systrom explained. "You can browse through the latest photos of people whom you follow with updates as people post new photos."

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