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TSA removing controversial X-ray scanners

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Friday, January 18, 2013

AP: The TSA is getting rid of body scanners that produce a naked image of airport travelers.

Right now the TSA uses two types of scanners. One makes a generic image showing where agents should look for an object on the traveler's body. Those scanners are staying.

The other kind of scanner uses X-rays. They raised privacy concerns because they show metal objects on the traveler's body — along with every other detail, too. Congress has mandated that those scanners be changed or removed by June.

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