Wind energy included in fiscal cliff deal

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Wednesday, January 02, 2013

USA Today: A one-year extension of a wind industry tax credit was included in the fiscal cliff deal passed by Congress.

The tax credit, which has been a major driver for wind development across the country in the past two decades, is worth 2.2 cents per kilowatt-hour of energy produced by new wind installations for their first 10 years of operation.

It would allow any project that begins construction in 2013 to claim the credit, even if it goes online in 2014, according to industry insiders. The tax credit that expired Monday could be claimed only for projects that were up and running in 2012.

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