Martha Stewart CEO steps down

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Wednesday, December 19, 2012

Washington Post: Martha Stewart Omnimedia CEO Lisa Gersh is stepping down after less than a year on the job.

The shakeup comes as the company, founded by lifestyle and home guru Martha Stewart, struggles to boost profits at its publishing and broadcast divisions and improve merchandising revenue.

The company said last month that it would downsize its magazines, and cut publishing jobs to focus on online video and other digital content. Martha Stewart will stop putting out its monthly Everyday Food magazine as a stand-alone publication, instead periodically wrapping it into the company’s flagship Martha Stewart Living magazine. It will make Everyday Food content available on the company’s website, a YouTube channel and through a daily video newsletter.

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