What do ‘right-to-work’ laws do to a state’s economy?

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Thursday, December 13, 2012
Washington Post: As Michigan becomes the 24th state to enact a "right to work" law, what effects do these laws have? It's still hard to find definitive evidence that right-to-work laws help (or harm) a state’s overall economy

Why the uproar? Under right-to-work laws, employees in unionized workplaces can no longer be required to pay unions for the cost of being represented. These statutes are broadly understood to erode the influence and power of organized labor — if unions have a harder time collecting money for the services they offer, they’ll have fewer resources to work with.

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