Home From the Wires Stephen Colbert leads polls for Senate seat

Stephen Colbert leads polls for Senate seat

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Tuesday, December 11, 2012

A poll released by Public Policy Polling shows that comedian Stephen Colbert is voters’ top pick for South Carolina's open Senate seat.

When Stephen Colbert announced that he wanted to be South Carolina’s next Senator, he garnered a lot of laughs. But some media outlets, and even voters, are apparently taking him seriously.

Colbert made the announcement on his show December 6 after the news broke that ultra-conservative Senator Jim DeMint of South Carolina was leaving his seat. That means that South Carolina Governor Nikki Haley, another Republican, will decide who gets to take DeMint’s seat next. Colbert wants it to be him.

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