Home From the Wires Starbucks sells new $7 cup of coffee

Starbucks sells new $7 cup of coffee

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Friday, November 30, 2012

Washington Post: Starbucks has started selling a specialty coffee that costs $7 for a 16-ounce “grande” cup, making it the company’s priciest brew.

The Costa Rica Finca Palmilera coffee costs $40 for a half- pound bag and $6 for a 12-ounce “tall” cup, Lisa Passe, a Starbucks spokeswoman, said in an e-mail. It’s made from a rare, difficult-to-grow varietal called Geisha. The new coffee is available at only 46 locations in the U.S. Northwest with expensive Clover brewing machines.

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