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Co-author of Three Cups of Tea dies in Multnomah County

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Wednesday, November 21, 2012

David Oliver Relin, the co-author of the best-selling book, Three Cups of Tea, reportedly died November 15th in Multnomah County, according to OutsideOnline.com. Details are being kept under wraps by the medical examiner's office:

...a spokesman for the county medical examiner confirmed that Relin died on Thursday, November 15. There will be no autopsy, and the cause of death has not been made public.

Relin co-authored the book with Greg Mortenson, describing Mortenson's tales of journeying in - and crusading for - Pakistan and Afghanistan. The book sold in the millions of copies and propelled Mortenson to a new level of both fame and humanitarian involvement.

However the book became somewhat controversial after famed non-fiction writer Jon Krakauer took aim at the book's sources and veracity in his own book, Three Cups of Deceit. Krakauer was at one point a substantial donor to Mortenson's causes, but aired his criticisms of the book on an episode of 60 Minutes after finding fault with its truthfulness.

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0 #1 ConsumerGuest 2012-11-22 01:28:15
To whom it ay concern , how do we get a least a walmart market place in Portland Oregon in our summer neighbor hood there property for sale between 75thand 82nd ave on killings worth , there sales would be outlandish , it's a main thourouh fair for highway 30 million cars a day , the neighbor hood would love it .please contact me would like to get a Peltition to strt signing, would make. Great spot for a store , it's next to sunbelt corporation , so iam sure it's commercial , please keep us in mind would love it
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