IBM reveals chip simulating brain

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Friday, August 08, 2014

Popular Mechanics: The chip simulates the human brain in its processes, thus making it far better at certain tasks than traditional microchip designs.

"This chip represents a completely new architecture for microchips," says study co-author Dharmendra Modha, a computer scientist at IBM Research-Almaden in San Jose, Calif. "It's a new machine for a new era." The scientists say the chip has incredible potential: It could be used in glasses for the visually impaired, medical imagers that can spot early signs of disease, and even driverless cars.

 

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