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Red wine health benefits 'overhyped'

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Tuesday, May 13, 2014

BBC: Scientists say that red wine may not be as good for health as first believed.

The team tracked the health of nearly 800 villagers from the Chianti region of Italy to see if their local tipple had any discernable impact.

They found no proof that the wine ingredient resveratrol stops heart disease or prolongs life.

Read more here.

 

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