Home From the Wires CO2 reduces nutrients in major food crops

CO2 reduces nutrients in major food crops

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Thursday, May 08, 2014

BBC: A new study reports that rising levels of carbon dioxide worldwide will significantly affect the nutrient content of crops.

Experiments show levels of zinc, iron and protein are likely to be reduced by up to 10% in wheat and rice by 2050.

The scientists say this could have health implications for billions of people, especially in the developing world.

 Read more here.

 

 

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