Study: Young blood rejuvenates older animals

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Monday, May 05, 2014

CBS: Older mice who were given blood and blood proteins from young mice showed improved muscle and brain function.

Scientists hope these mouse studies will lead to anti-aging treatments for humans.

Looking forward to clinical trial research on humans -- which researchers say will begin this year -- the hope is that the particular protein will be identified so researchers won't need all of the blood from the young person.

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