Home From the Wires Effects of childhood bullying last a lifetime

Effects of childhood bullying last a lifetime

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Friday, April 18, 2014

BBC: Researchers found that bullied children still experience negative effects on their physical and mental health more than 40 years later.

Their study tracked 7,771 children born in 1958 from the age of seven until 50.

Those bullied frequently as children were at an increased risk of depression and anxiety, and more likely to report a lower quality of life at 50.

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