Mt. Gox finds 200,000 missing Bitcoins

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Friday, March 21, 2014

Bloomberg: The Tokyo-based digital currency exchange located 200,000 of the 850,000 Bitcoins it said had gone missing.

The company said its revised count of missing Bitcoins, 650,000, may change depending on the results of an investigation.

Mt. Gox said Feb. 24 it lost 750,000 Bitcoins belonging to users and 100,000 more of its own, which were valued at about $500 million at the time. The exchange said in a statement that its debt exceeded assets by 2.7 billion yen ($26.4 million.)

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