Science supports '5-second rule' for dropped food

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Friday, March 14, 2014

Forbes: A new study found some truth to the "five-second rule," which suggests it's safe to consume food that has touched the floor as long as its within the five-second limit.

But take this with a grain of salt. The study doesn’t appear to be peer-reviewed or published anywhere. We need other researchers to have  a chance to review these results and then re-do the experiment before we can be sure it’s OK to eat that bagel you just picked up.

Read more here.

 

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