White House reveals 2015 budget

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Tuesday, March 04, 2014

WSJ: President Obama proposed a $3.9 trillion budget package.

The president's spending plan for the fiscal year that begins Oct. 1 doesn't rest on new or lofty policy goals, reflecting a town hibernating from budget exhaustion and girding for midterm elections in November. Instead, it offers targeted and familiar proposals, including an overhaul of corporate taxes, which it says would boost job growth and make U.S. businesses more competitive.

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