Violent video games hold back 'moral maturity' in teens

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Thursday, February 06, 2014

BBC: A study in Canada found teenagers who played violent video games for long periods of time lacked empathy.

Brock University academics studied the behaviour of pupils at seven schools in Ontario, trying to understand the relationship between the type of video games played, the length of time spent playing and how it might affect their attitudes.

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