Subway to remove chemical from bread

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Thursday, February 06, 2014

USA Today: The sandwich chain is removing a chemical commonly used in shoe rubber from its bread.

"We are already in the process of removing Azodiacarbonamide as part of our bread improvement efforts despite the fact that it is USDA and FDA approved ingredient," the company says in a statement. "The complete conversion to have this product out of the bread will be done soon."

Read more here.

 

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