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College diversity is expensive

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Tuesday, January 21, 2014

The Atlantic: President Obama has called on colleges to increase low-income student enrollment, but for elite schools, committing to financial-aid students will lead to budget cuts and decreased revenue.

Making a commitment to a financial-aid student not only requires committing a greater proportion of endowment dollars to grants; it also means forgoing the revenue that a full-paying student would bring in.

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Guest
+1 #1 More Social Engineering brought to you by Barack Obama and CompanyGuest 2014-01-21 19:18:33
Does our Commander in Chief really think that after screwing up our health care system that he really has any credibility to "fix" our higher education system? Mandated top down government programs historically fail. Why don't we try to get these kids into the community colleges and then onto the state colleges? Let's get the best bang for our buck! Let's get these students a quality and more affordable education. Let's get them out in the real working world(not government jobs)where they can pay back their student loans and contribute positively to our economy!
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Guest
0 #2 Many Options for EducationGuest 2014-01-23 21:15:19
Interesting how Obama is stuck on the old model of bricks and mortar colleges with high costs, high tuition rates and high ratios of administrators to teaching staff. The way to solve this is to provide MORE GOVERNEMENT GRANTS AND LOANS! Golly how's that workin' out? We have students with tens of thousands in debt having graduated with some meaningless "XYZ Studies" degree and trying to pay it off by being a barista at Starbucks.

There are far more economical and efficient ways to provide a good education including the MOOKS and other online degree programs from RESPECTED institutions such as Georgia Tech. I am not talking about "Become a truck driver in 90 days!" curricula but the kind of STIM focus that puts the money into teaching the student and not on swimming pools and deans of diversity.
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