Poverty is literally making people sick

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Thursday, January 16, 2014

The Atlantic: People with low incomes are 27% more likely to be hospitalized for hypoglycemia.

That's what researchers found when they looked at the numbers for California between 2000 and 2008. As you can see in their chart below, low-income people (red line) were <27 percent more likely to be hospitalized for hypoglycemia in the last week of the month than in the first. There was no week-to-week difference for high-income people (orange line).

Read more here.

 

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