Income influences how women view marriage

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Wednesday, January 15, 2014

The Atlantic: Statistics show that low-income women often face economic challenges if they choose to stay single.

This is not to say that all low-income women should marry, that it's their fault if they're not married, or that marriage is the silver-bullet solution to solving income inequality, as Fleischer and his supporters might argue. But it is important for the resistance against "patriarchy" to be mixed with a recognition of statistical reality: Marriage is good for women economically.

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Guest
+1 #1 GPA/BSHCGuest 2014-01-15 21:40:34
I raised my daughter as a struggling, young, single parent in school, and I never once asked for a single dime from a man or a woman (other than the child support owed to my child). The best advice my father gave me, which still rings true to this day: "never depend on anyone else for your own well-being". Were there times when I needed help? Of course! I did my welfare stint, but only when it was sorely needed, and I still made sure to pay back every dime! As for marriage, I am 40, my only offspring is a successful adult, and I have a decent career (finally!) along with being single by choice (I am lucky, for not all women have the choice, sadly). For me, being a successful parent, worker, activist, and someday business leader, has always been more important, than being a successful wife, I suppose. The only thing holding me back from choosing a would-be spouse, is the fact that I have college debt, that still needs to be paid back, and I highly doubt that our government, is interested in student debt loan forgiveness, so that some measly, orphaned, disillusioned Generation Xer such as myself, can finally find a mate, LOL (:
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